nternational Association of
Biologicals and Computational Digest

Review Articles

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1

STRATIFICATION, MAPPING AND QUANTIFICATION OF MAJOR GRASS ON BEDIA BET INCLUDING PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY IN GREAT RANN OF KACHCHH

Desai Nirmal,Mankad Archana and Jasrai Yogesh
iABCD|Vol 1|Issue 2|Dec 2016| 80-89|

The goal of this study is to know that how the current vegetation is flourishing in this region which has been completely hostile for any kind of vegetation  and also to know the palaeoclimate of this region that once supported human life.It is mentioned in the Gazetteer of India, Gujarat, Kachchh district (1971) that not a single blade of grass was growing in this region. At present the north western as well as the Bet zone is covered with vegetation mainly with different grass species. Therefore it is necessary to monitor the vegetation and also the changes taking place in this region. Multidate and multispectral satellite data can be used for mapping and monitoring the vegetation growth and other changes.Many geologist, scientist and archaeologist have worked and have published their work recently which shows that the region was inhabitated in the past having cities/towns/villages or forts e.g. Lakhpat fort, Sindri fort,

2

SEASONAL VARIATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN CHANDOLA LAKE, AHMEDABAD

Qureshimatva Umerfaruq, Maurya Rupesh,Gamit Sandip,Mamta K. Joshi nd Solanki Hitesh A
iABCD|Vol 1|Issue 2 | Dec 2016| 6 9 - 79 |

The quantitative study of phytoplankton in Chandola Lake was studied during September 2013 to August 2014 by analysing samples taken each month from 9 sampling stations. Identified 29 species of the phytoplankton in 4 classes are as follows: Chlorophyceae 13 species, Bacillariophyceae 10 species, Cyanophyceae 5 species and Euglinophyceae only 1 species. Cyanophyceae was dominant during monsoon season and summer season which revile the presence of organic pollutants in the lake.

3

Greenhouse Gas emissions from the field Burning of Crop residues for the state of Gujarat

Parmar Mona and Solanki Hitesh
iABCD|Vol 1|Issue 1 |Sep 2016| 47 - 59 |

The quantity of greenhouse gases emitted and the source responsible for its emission are necessary to determine the solution for climate change and its impact. In Gujarat a large part of crop residue is burnt in the fields since the farmers do not have any worthwhile use of this waste and the combine-harvester leaves, a large part of this residue in the field itself in the form of long stems and the roots. And thus these burnings of crop residue lead to the emission of greenhouse gases. The main objective of this study was to calculate the GHG emissions from the burning of crop residues for the state of Gujarat.CO2, CH4 and N2O emission from crop residue burning were calculated for the year 1980 to 2011 for the state of Gujarat. For each plant gross CO2 equivalent emission and emission intensity (footprint) was determined for 31 years (1980 to 2011) to study an emission trend. As a result, Crop residue burning emissions are increasing by the year, but the emission intensity remains&

4

STUDY OF PHYSIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN TWO PONDS OF PADRA TALUKA, VADODARA

JOSHI MAMTA K., VADHWANA ZEEL H. AND SOLANKI HITESH A.
iABCD|Vol 1|Issue 2 | Dec 2016| 60 - 68 |

A study was conducted to study the physiochemical parameters of two ponds of Vadodara district in Gujarat. Many natural and man-made wetlands are there in the district. In this research paper two ponds from the sub taluka Padra is selected for the collection of sample and its physiochemical analysis. Conductivity, Total hardness, pH, turbidity, such 19 parameters are analysed by standard method .samples were collected in 2010 and 2011 in pre monsoon, monsoon and post monsoon for comparative study of them.

5

Nutrient Management for Enhanced Growth of Catharanthus roseus L.

Pandya Jahnavi, Qureshi Shirin, Mankad Archana
iABCD|Vol 1|Issue 1 |Sep 2016| 40 - 4 6 |

Plants absorb nutrients through the roots and through the foliage. When soil conditions are unfavorable or when micronutrients are needed, it may be desirable to make foliar applications of the plant nutrients. Foliar fertilization entails the application - via spraying of nutrients to plant leaves and stems and their absorption at those sites. The ability of plant leaves to absorb water and nutrients was recognized approximately three centuries ago. Present study shows the effect of foliar application of Boron and Manganese on the growth of Catharanthus roseus L. Boric acid and Manganese sulphate were applied as a foliar spray at different concentrations. Plant height, Root weight, Shoot weight and Number of leaves were monitored during plant development. Results clearly show that foliar application of boric acid and manganese sulphate mixture solution is beneficial for Catharanthus roseus L.